Live to learn and you will learn to live. Portuguese proverb

Tags: pentecostalism

Oh Lord, won't you buy me ...

by Christoph Email

Time.comhas aninteresting article on the relation between prosperity gospel and the economic crisis. Although their title blows it way out of proportions by suggesting that God might be to blame for the whole mess, the article is an interesting read wi… more »

The Spirit, the Text and the Reader

by Christoph Email

How does the Bible convey God?s truth to me, the reader, in a way that God can do something in my life? This question is the crux behind any discussion of Pentecostal hermeneutics. Different answers have been given and reflect the different stages in the… more »

Christology and Pneumatology: Inseparable twins

by Christoph Email

When one of my Google Alerts brought me to the Catholic Analysis blog, I was surprised to find the opinion that ...the truest, fullest, and most authentic "Pentecostalism" is already available in the heart of the Catholic Church [...]. Oh, rea… more »

Council blogging

by Christoph Email

At the Pentecostal BFP movement's 112th general council for the moment, I'm one of the lucky few with an internet connection, thanks to my hotspot flat rate. I hope to be sharing some reflections from an inspiring event with my readers, so, stay tuned. Just a few minutes ago, I had submitted a rather lengthy article to begin with, but my blogging software somehow killed it and I don't have the time right now to type it again. 

In a couple of minutes, I'm off to today's business session, dealing, among other topics, with "hot" topic of the movement's relationship to the ACK, Germany's largest ecumenical council -- which (and that's the problem) contains among other members the Roman Catholic church. So, it's going to be an interesting afternoon and I hope to be back with some updates.

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pre/anti/para/post -- Whither Pentecostalism, when modernity is on its way out

by Christoph Email

Mainstream Evangelicalism is basically a modernistic movement -- there's no doubt about it. In many places, Evangelicals have become synonymous with Evangelical Fundamentalism. Along with liberalism, its eternal foe, fundamentalism is deeply entrenched in the modern way of reasoning coming directly out of the European Enlightenment. But where does Evangelicalism go when its underlying modernistic epistemology is disappearing? Most interestingly, large parts of the wider Evangelical movement seem to cling to modernism with all their might -- steering themselves ever wider into a neo-fundamentalist trap of irrelevance to the new, postmodern culture.

While I firmly believe that Pentecostalism is and always has been part of the Evangelical movement, this is a good moment to note a decisive distinction: Pentecostalism never really was modern. Label it however you want, I for one prefer the term "para-modern" that Ken Archer argued for in his 2001 book A Pentecostal Hermeneutics for the Twenty First Century. Now, this would seem like good news and an open road ahead for Pentecostalism, where it not for many Pentecostals' strive to become "more Evangelical", which often brings us dangerously close to the neo-fundamentalist Evangelical. Do we really want to go there? Or might the "way out" for Evangelicalism's current cul-de-sac be in the very Pentecostal part of its fold? Certainly, the early twenty-first century does seem like a bad time to finally jump on the modernist bandwaggon and adopt what we've been spared so far.

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