Live to learn and you will learn to live. Portuguese proverb

Latest Comments

Shannon Buckner

In response to: The Shack -- or: how the story of a meeting with God becomes a theology book

Shannon Buckner [Visitor]
Loved your critical analysis of The Shack. I went into reading it the same as you - it's a novel, enjoy it for what it is, and was pleasantly surprised by the narrative and couldn't put it down. I think it's a powerful book and hopefully can bring some hope and healing to those who need to see the Trinity in a little different way. I like different! Thanks Christoph - always a pleasure to hear your insight!
Shannon
PermalinkPermalink 06/30/09 @ 20:30
Andrew Potter

In response to: Should Evangelicals Embrace or Resist Postmodernism?

Andrew Potter [Visitor]
Now that I've think thought about it some more. The two are not as distinct as a supposed. When PM is prevalent in everyday society one has no choice but to embrace or resist with a possible third option namely "ignore".
PermalinkPermalink 02/13/09 @ 13:43
Andrew Potter

In response to: Should Evangelicals Embrace or Resist Postmodernism?

Andrew Potter [Visitor]
IMHO your post does not accurately answer the question posed in the title. To embrace postmodernism implies (in my understanding) an acknowledgment of correctness and an adoption of viewpoints within evangelical theology/practice. To resist is to do the opposite.

To me this is different than a realization that PM has become highly influential in the west and that as Christians we need to be informed about and engage it.
PermalinkPermalink 02/13/09 @ 13:21
Jace

In response to: New friends in the "theologian's corner"

Jace [Visitor]
Well written article.
PermalinkPermalink 10/29/08 @ 05:20
Esa HyvŲnen

In response to: The first postmodern philosopher?

Esa HyvŲnen [Visitor]
Perhaps an anachronistic biblical interpretation but a cool one ;).
PermalinkPermalink 08/22/08 @ 17:59
Brian LePort

In response to: Out of the inbox mess

Brian LePort [Visitor]
Hey Christoph,

You may be interested in this blog and you may also be interested in writing for it. It is AzusaRemixed.com. Let me know if you would be interested in writing about European pentecostalism and on pentecostal theology once you have visited the site.
PermalinkPermalink 07/15/08 @ 20:03
Brad Meador

In response to: Out of the inbox mess

Brad Meador [Visitor]
Thanks for the thoughtful review of our product, Christoph! I'm pleased to hear that ClearContext is working out for you. Please send an email to us at support at clearcontext dot com so that I can discuss with you further. Thanks!
PermalinkPermalink 07/15/08 @ 16:26
Brad

In response to: The Spirit, the Text and the Reader

Brad [Visitor]
Christoph - this is an excellent post. i find myself wrestling with a lot of these issues, not just on a personal level, but in the classes i teach, particularly hermeneutics. i think you're right, though, on several fronts: pentecostalism should be a natural fit for (some) postmodern readings, but its alliance with modern evangelicalism/fundamentalism is a hindrance. (you're right on the theology textbook issue as well -we struggle with that here but have few alternatives.)
The same for your thoughts on historical enquiry and boundaries of interpretation: it seems we are in a position to enjoy both the freedom from the tyranny of authorial intention while getting the benefits of general historical and cultural background.

ok, i'm just repeating everything you said now! i'll quit there...

How is the research coming? Looking forward to seeing how this all take shapes. Maybe a helpful hermeneutics textbook in the future?!?
PermalinkPermalink 05/26/08 @ 14:11
Dave Carrol

In response to: When the Holy Spirit comes to town

Dave Carrol [Visitor]
Awesome... I love hearing what God's doing in Germany!
PermalinkPermalink 05/19/08 @ 20:25
John

In response to: Pushing a non-violent metanarrative

John [Visitor]
Hi, Im from Melbourne Australia.
Please check out these 2 related references on a non-violent meta-narrative.

1. http://www.ispeace723.org
2. http://www.coteda.com

Plus related references.

1. http://www.dabase.org/radicpol.htm
2. http://www.dabase.org/restsacr.htm
PermalinkPermalink 12/21/07 @ 23:13
adol77dai51

In response to: Anselm and I -- what a lovely combination

adol77dai51 [Member]
I did have the impression that the survey seemed familiar. And, behold, looking through my archives, I found that I already took the test once before:

http://www.chris.toph.de/blog/archives/52-Beyond-boundaries.html

Back the, I turned out to be "Wesleyan holiness-evangelical", which didn't even make it into the top ten this time. So, here's to an evolving theologian :-)!
PermalinkPermalink 09/07/07 @ 08:51
Shannon

In response to: I dig Jesus -- the meme goes on

Shannon [Visitor]
Thanks for the tag and I've finally updated my blog!
PermalinkPermalink 07/22/07 @ 08:37
John Smulo

In response to: I dig Jesus -- the meme goes on

John Smulo [Visitor]
Great list. You have a great blog here, look forward to reading more.
PermalinkPermalink 07/14/07 @ 04:46
Rich Tatum

In response to: I dig Jesus -- the meme goes on

Rich Tatum [Visitor]
Hey, major congratulations on the newest cu of coffee! Wahoo!

You're right, two take far more time, and it's not just two kids, it's the added strain on mommy dearest that will also take more of your attention and TLC.

Welcome back, nonetheless!

I like your list! Honestly, besides mine, of course, it's probably the most enjoyable to read so far. A couple new twists I hadn't thought of, like the visualcy thing and the in/exclusion thing.

And I like the phrase, "Openly Scandalous Lifestyle." That rocks!

Thanks for playing a serious game.

Rich
BlogRodent
PermalinkPermalink 07/11/07 @ 09:06
antti

In response to: I dig Jesus -- the meme goes on

antti [Visitor]
hey - hoo, thanks for the challenge. I'd should come up with a list. :)
PermalinkPermalink 07/11/07 @ 08:49
Rich Tatum

In response to: Look at me

Rich Tatum [Visitor]
Clearly, you are a lover, not a fighter!

Rich
BlogRodent
PermalinkPermalink 04/08/07 @ 06:52
antti

In response to: Look at me

antti [Visitor]
handsome for sure... and tell me that the pic's from your backyard :)
PermalinkPermalink 04/01/07 @ 12:37
my cup of coffee » Beyond boundaries

In response to: I'm not a heretic. Are you?

[...] Svensvensven, of "Are you a heretic?" fame, has been active at the QuizFarm again. His new question is, "Which theologian are you?" Naturally, I couldn’t resist taking the test. To my surprise I turned out a "Wesleyan holiness-evangelical" — would you believe it? I had hoped to get a couple of points more on Pentecostalism! Of course, this started my thinking, and here’s what’s come out of it so far: 1. Even while I greatly appreciate my theological heritage and I am well aware of the context that it puts me in, I am trying to think beyond traditional boundaries, as I think all honest theological reasoning has to. That makes my theological outlook somewhat eclectic — from my point of view, the best of all worlds.  2. Of course, part of the explanation is — surprise! — that the quiz itself is put together from a subjective point of view, too. While I am not aware of what exactly svensvensven’s background is, at least one question seemed quite strange to me. On a scale of agreement from 0 to 5, I had to rate the statement, "Speaking in tongues is the most important element of salvation" [Unfortunately, I lost my page cache and the questions are changing each time, so, forgive me if the quote isn’t guaranteed to be literal.] I gave this phrase a 1, because I don’t agree. I love speaking in tongues and greatly appreciate this gift God has given to me. But, "the most important element of salvation?" That’s way overrated. Still, I guess, picking a five would have given me a lot more points on Pentecostalism. Is this how Pentecostals appear to the outside?   [...]
PermalinkPermalink 10/25/06 @ 17:02
The Schooley Files

In response to: Ramblings on teaching in the Pentecostal church

The Schooley Files [Visitor]
Have a Cup of Coffee with Christoph Fischer... I'd like to welcome my cup of coffee to the blogroll. Christoph Fischer is a pentecostal pastor and doctoral candidate (yes, I did say that in the same breath) in Germany....
PermalinkPermalink 10/14/06 @ 07:21
Keith Schooley

In response to: Ramblings on teaching in the Pentecostal church

Keith Schooley [Visitor]
Hi Christoph,

Just ran across your blog through Rich Tatum's site. Your thesis here is fascinating. It would be helpful to disentangle how actual teaching, study, and theological reflection is assisted by (without being supplanted by) the person and work of the Holy Spirit. I take it that you don't want simply to lapse back into the old-fashioned Pentecostal hermeneutic, but rather want to form a synthesis between that and (for lack of a better term) rational Biblical and theological study.

I really love your remarks and the relationship you've posited between Postmodernism and Pentecostalism. These are hardly ever discussed in the same breath.
PermalinkPermalink 10/14/06 @ 07:18
Brad

In response to: Define: Pentecostal

Brad [Visitor]
one more thing - defining often depends on how and why one is defining. so, for instance, jamie smith wants to define pentecostalism in terms of being anti-modern, and thus a worthy dialogue partner for radical orthodoxy:

"I would propose five key elements of a Pentecostal worldview and theology: (1) a positioning of radical openness to God, and in particular, God doing something differently or new. I take the central point of the narrative of Acts 2 to be Peter's courage and willingness to recognize in these "strange" phenomena the operation of the Spirit and declare it to be a work of God. To declare "this is that" (Acts 2:16) was to be open to God working in unexpected ways. In postmodern terms, we might describe this as an openness to alterity or otherness. (2) Because of this, Pentecostal communities emphasize the continued ministry of the Spirit, including continuing revelation, prophecy, and the centrality of charismatic giftings in the ecclesial community. (3) Included in this ministry of the Spirit is a distinctive belief in the healing of the body as a central aspect of the Atonement. This central belief is an indication of a Pentecostal deconstruction of fundamentalist dualisms. (4) Because of an emphasis on the role of experience, and in contrast to rationalistic Evangelical theology, Pentecostal theology is rooted in an affective epistemology - undoing just the kind of dualisms that [Radical Orthodoxy] seeks to deconstruct. And finally, (5) contrary to common assumptions about the "otherworldliness" of Pentecostals, the movement is characterized by a central commitment to empowerment and social justice, with a certain "preferential option for the marginalized" tracing back to its roots at Azusa Street as a kind of paradigm of marginalization - a revival in an abandon stable, led by an African-American preacher."
√ʬ?¬?What Hath Azusa Street To do With Cambridge?: Radical Orthodoxy and Pentecostal Theology in Conversation,√ʬ?¬Ě PNEUMA: Journal of the Society for Pentecostal Studies 24 (2002)
PermalinkPermalink 07/06/06 @ 12:06
Brad

In response to: Christocentrism as organizing principle

Brad [Visitor]
interesting stuff. it strikes me that the four (or five) fold perspective on Jesus is much more holistic than many of our usual understandings. by the way, what does Jesus as baptizer mean? just curious.

also interesting that a 'pneumatic' movement might be Christocentric, as much of our theology is drawn from Acts and Paul. i know that is not the entire picture, but it often seems the case. perhaps a renewed focus on Christ again gives us an opportunity to see the work of the Spirit in a broader context, something which I at least think is needed.

by the way, one of the 'distinctives' of the emerging church conversation is a renewed focus on Christocentric thought - which might be a backlash against a heavily Pauline Christianity, i'm not sure. just a possibly interesting point of intersection.
PermalinkPermalink 07/06/06 @ 11:56
Brad

In response to: Define: Pentecostal

Brad [Visitor]
this is difficult - does one define pentecostal theology, pentecostal spirituality, socio-political dynamics? some of the aspects you list here can fall into several of these categories. if the question is one of 'identity' (what qualifies one as pentecostal), more than theological definition is needed, no?
again, i think your work is going to be helpful in a lot of these areas that need some clarification.
PermalinkPermalink 07/06/06 @ 11:45
Brad

In response to: Ramblings on teaching in the Pentecostal church

Brad [Visitor]
Christoph - the teaching question is one that is popping up with greater frequency here in Ireland as well. we are running into more and more people who are frustrated and starving for some depth, but for many of the reasons you have listed, they are not given any. there are signs this is changing, but it may take some time. especially here in ireland pentecostalism is very young, and emerging from that adolescence takes time.
as to your thesis, i think this holds some real possibilities and i'm looking forward to it being expanded. one thing i think it might offer is a broadening of our understanding of what the spirit entails for believers (beyond tongues, etc). it really opens the possibility of a holistic understanding of the work of the spirit, something we desperately need. keep it up!
PermalinkPermalink 07/01/06 @ 12:33
adol77dai51

In response to: Grabbing bible text from the net

adol77dai51 [Member]
Hi Shawn,

Unfortunately, systematic theologies are direly lacking in classical Pentecostalism. I could, however, point you to the following works:

- Duffield, Guy and Nathanael van Cleave. Foundations of Pentecostal Theology. Los Angeles, CA: LIFE Bible College, 1983. This is a quite comprehensive volume which reflects classical Pentecostal theology rather well. The authors come from a Foursquare-church perspective. Unfortunately, in terms of Academics the book has some deficiencies (e.g. not even a bibliography).

- Horton, Stanley M. and Gary McGee. Systematic Theology: A Pentecostal Perspective. Springfield, MO: Logion Press, 1994. Although somewhat more of a reader in systematic theology, this volume provides a nice overview over classical Pentecostal theology.

I guess that's the best we can come up with at the moment. There are some contributions from outside of the classical mainstream (J. Rodman Williams' "Renewal Theology" or Clark Pinnock's "Flame of Love", for example), but otherwise that's about it. Inside the Assemblies of God movement, I am also aware of some very old theological treatises (Ernest Williams, Myer Pearlman, P.C. Nelson), but they hardly deserve the label "systematic theology."
PermalinkPermalink 06/23/06 @ 05:31
Shawn Lazar

In response to: Grabbing bible text from the net

Shawn Lazar [Visitor]
Hi Christopher!
I'm also a student at the Vrije Universiteit, under the supervision of Dean Van de Beek. I was wondering if you knew of any one-volume Pentecostal systematic theologies?
PermalinkPermalink 06/22/06 @ 22:57
brad anderson

In response to: Cult, movement, or what

brad anderson [Visitor]
chrstoph, thanks for the heads up on the issue, and for the link to Tatum, which is an interesting read. in fact, his blog took me to a hitherto unknown world of pentecostal blogging! hope all is well on your end.
PermalinkPermalink 02/06/06 @ 13:57
esa hyv√?¬∂nen

In response to: Breaking news on the Dead Sea Scrolls

esa hyv√?¬∂nen [Visitor]
interesting. i would like to know the reference as well...
PermalinkPermalink 11/11/05 @ 16:21
brad anderson

In response to: Breaking news on the Dead Sea Scrolls

brad anderson [Visitor]
christoph, i hadn't heard this news. can you point me in the direction of some blogs/sites dealing with this?
PermalinkPermalink 11/09/05 @ 14:32
brad anderson

In response to: Uwe Schäfer on overly literal interpretation

brad anderson [Visitor]
that's a fantastic quote! i think i'll start using it myself....
PermalinkPermalink 08/11/05 @ 07:58
brad anderson

In response to: How can a meta-narrative not be oppressive?

brad anderson [Visitor]
i haven't read this book of thiselton's, but i like where you say he's going with this idea. i reviewed an article by merold westphal where he basically argues the same thing - yes, christianity is a metanarrative; no, it's NOT the type of metanarrative lyotard and others rejected.
one of the reasons i like this is because it is taking a constructive yet engaging approach to the problem - not simply co-opting the postmodern theory or pretending it doesn't exist...we have enough of those types of approaches already!
one more point, and that is that there are several levels in christianity where we can talk about metanarratives. for instance, there is the whole christian worldview, which i believe is what you are talking about here. but there is also the bible - a metanarrative text for a metanarrative faith, some would say. any thoughts on this? (richard bauckham has an excellent piece on this in an edited volume called 'the art of reading scripture'. interestingly, he takes a similar approach to that of thiselton/westphal in arguing that the bible is not a metanarrative in the modern sense of the word. i talked a bit about it here.)
PermalinkPermalink 07/13/05 @ 15:14
my cup of coffee » How can a meta-narrative not be oppressive?

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

[...] I have already mentioned (in one of my replies to Brad Andersen) that I cannot but see the Christian story as a meta-narrative. Its claims to exclusivity, universality, and absolute truth are completely incompatible with the post-modern portrait of a “local story” within a community. Yet, I do think that the story of faith, i.e. the story of the Spirit-filled community, is able to escape the post-modern criticism against meta-narratives for a number of reasons. One of them has just re-surfaced in my reading of Anthony Thiselton’s Interpreting God and the Postmodern Self: On Meaning, Manipulation and Promise: In chapter 3 (”Do All Controlling Models in Religion Serve Manipulative Purposes?”) Thiselton refers to the New Testament, to Luther’s “theology of the cross”, to Bonhoeffer’s writings and to J√?¬ľrgen Moltmann in order to show that the Christian story is not promoting power and glory for its proponents. Criticism levelled against it from the days of Nietzsche through Heidegger, Foucault, and Rorty, has therefore no base: The Christian community is not seeking to promote itself above all other communities. Rather, it is seeking to promote Jesus Christ, the liberator, who sets people free from oppression. But, that’s already another argument … [...]
PermalinkPermalink 07/12/05 @ 12:42
Antti H

In response to: Antti Hirviniemi: Knowledge of God

Antti H [Visitor]
Thanks Christoph, I did read your definition, which I though to be very well concluded. What I meant by pessimism was - toward the strain of though that would be described as postmodernism, as undefinable it might be, - the expectation that postmodernity won't in itself bring support to faith.

Although from one point of view modernity has caused much challenge to knowing God, the fall of it in rise of postmodernity won't unavoidably bring back what's lost.

Overall, knowing God has been possible within the challenge modernity, (in fact with a great force at some places) and it will be within postmodernity. The key issue of a person knowing or not lies elsewhere. The dominant worldview of a society brings the challenge that the spirit lead community conqueres at it always have done.

Whether or not you share my pessimism as I though you would, I think there's no realism in expecting the climate change more friendly to the faith by itself.
PermalinkPermalink 07/08/05 @ 15:42
brad anderson

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

brad anderson [Visitor]
aagghh...i can see when you phrase it like this - the people of God as spirit-filled community - why it would be of interest for you phd work. sounds really interesting (and much needed).

couple of points on your points (!): i agree that the christian story can and should be a metanarrative. however, i do think it will take some re-thinking on our part so it's not a totalizing story that excludes all other stories or dialogues, something that will just not be tolerated in postmodernity (or post-whatever). i think rowan williams, among others, has good stuff to say on this.

secondly, i find it really interesting that you put tradition above scripture on your list. i think you're on to something here, and i really like the re-incorporation of tradition that we're seeing today. there's no reason why community's that are 'truth-seeking' need to be only based in the present; why not pull from the past of our communities as well? and this is possibly another area where we as evangelicals/pentecostals have a lot to learn. our use of tradition has to extend more than 100 years ago.

hopefully i'll read through your dissertation stuff soon....
PermalinkPermalink 07/08/05 @ 12:56
adol77dai51

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

adol77dai51 [Member]
am i following you correctly in saying that you think the shift to communities as bearers of truth is not such a bad thing? and if so, what about competing truth claims among communities? is this where truth conveyed in 'praxis' comes in to play?




You are following me correctly: I find the move toward the community very positive. Of course, I am aware of the possible problems arising from this model, but I think they are answered by the fact that there is one very special community: the people of God, i.e. the Spirit-filled community.



I think by acknowledging the work of the Spirit within this community, a number of problems are eliminated:



(1) There might be provision for (objective?) access to a higher, absolute truth -- Yes, if you've read my working definition, you'll know that I insist on retaining the Christian faith as a meta-narrative. The work of the Spirit in the believer should enable us to overcome certain human limitations.



(2) There definitely is provision for a number of sources for theology, arising out of this community:

(a) Tradition, i.e. the tradition of the Spirit-filled community, i.e. the proliferation of whatever truth this community has discovered (yes, I am actually using discovered here!) by the help of the Spirit.

(b) Scripture, which should of course be number one, but follows more logically here, since it is simply an inscripturation of the original community tradition, prompted and inspired by the Holy Spirit.

(c) Reason, which has to be taken into account because it necessarily affects the individual's truth position, out of which the community truth is then "compiled." Reason can be listed as a valid source here, because we need to assume that, if you're indwelled by the Spirit, your reason is somehow affected.

(4) The same goes for the experience of the individual believer, which also is affected by the indwelling Holy Spirit, and, in turn, affects the person of the believer and his individual stance on truth.



I have to stop here, because otherwise I'll write my whole doctoral dissertation right here in this comment. This is exactly my topic, so, if you'd like to know more, my dissertation page would be a good starting point.
PermalinkPermalink 07/08/05 @ 12:28
toph.thoughts

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

toph.thoughts [Visitor]
Antti Hirviniemi: Knowledge of God
Antti Hirviniemi has joined our recent discussion on post-modernism and the knowledge of God by posting to his own blog. In his summary of my statements about post-modern epistemology, he remarks that [...] Christoph takes a generally pessimistic (perh...
PermalinkPermalink 07/08/05 @ 12:10
brad anderson

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

brad anderson [Visitor]
i totally agree that a pure nonfoundationalism is not possible, and the the individual as 'truth maker' is also a fallacy. (just so you know, i might need to borrow your illustrations for the future!)

am i following you correctly in saying that you think the shift to communities as bearers of truth is not such a bad thing? and if so, what about competing truth claims among communities? is this where truth conveyed in 'praxis' comes in to play?

PermalinkPermalink 07/08/05 @ 12:08
adol77dai51

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

adol77dai51 [Member]
i'd also be interested in your thoughts on what you mention about community as validating particular hermeneutics or truth claims.




Okay, let me elaborate a bit on this (I really like to discuss this, since all of this will be somehow part of my Ph.D. dissertation):



First of all, we need to realize that full-fledged non-foundationalism is simply not livable: I'm going to take language as an example, since it is very much discussed by post-modern philosophers. Now, Mr. Derrida, or Mr. Rorty will tell you that language is nothing but a mass of empty signifiers. Meaning is never inherent in those, but it is attached by the interpreter. However, if we'd try to live this out to its full extent, human communication would simply be impossible. You might attach a completely different meaning to my words than I do -- you might even understand the exact opposite, if you choose to do so.



Truth -- in this case about linguistic signifiers -- cannot be completely individual. But since we do not have a metastructure (or metanarrative) to predefine truth for us any more, the new solution is found in the community: from all of the individual truths of its members, the community creates some kind of an "average", a consensus, in order to be able and live with one another. This process is usually facilitated by the fact that communities mostly consist of somewhat similar people, who will therefore arrive at somewhat similar versions of truth. In other words, their "truths" overlap in part.



One of my favourite real-world examples for the impossibility of living with completely individualized truth version is a traffic light at a pedestrian crossing. Our current community consensus is that a red light means "no crossing the street now." Of course, anyone could redefine this truth and decide that red means "cross the street." But when that truck hits you, you'll know that you can't live with your own, different truth in practice.



Second, the "individual" who creates "truth" needs to be re-examined. Many post-modern thinkers have come to modify their view of the observer's thinking self. Just as one of the basic tenets of post-modernism claims that observed truth is always affected by the person of the observer, so the person of the observer is -- in turn -- affected by the truth he has observed and assimilated. In other words, the "self" never remains the same, but is trapped in a process of perpetual change. Thus, even the same observation by the same individual might not lead to the same definition of truth twice. Therefore, individual "self" cannot serve as a proper source of truth.



Only the community, which remains much more constant in its averaging consensus , can provide some kind of stable version of truth. Of course, even the community consensus is based on perpetually changing truth versions and therefore itself perpetually changing, but as it is an "average", changes will be much smaller and much slower in effect.
PermalinkPermalink 07/07/05 @ 13:43
brad anderson

In response to: bradandgeo: Augustine and the knowledge of God...

brad anderson [Visitor]
good thoughts, christoph. you actually beat me to it, but i'm working on a post dealing with the 'living out' aspect that is, as you say, attractive to the world around us. i'd also be interested in your thoughts on what you mention about community as validating particular hermeneutics or truth claims. you've probably read more on this than i have, but i'd like to think there are alternatives to absolute foundationalism and free-for-all anything goes non-foundationalism. i think praxis plays a big part in this, but i haven't really thought it through enough. anyway, thanks again for your post, it's made me think a bit harder on the issue.
PermalinkPermalink 07/07/05 @ 13:19
brad anderson

In response to: Dissertation, here I come

brad anderson [Visitor]
that's great christoph, congrats. stupid question, but what language will your research be in?
PermalinkPermalink 06/30/05 @ 13:26
Antti

In response to: Dissertation, here I come

Antti [Visitor]
Congrats Christoph, I shall take a look at it in near future. I tried to view the powerpoint show, but couldn't due to not being logged in or something, but I'll try another time.
PermalinkPermalink 06/30/05 @ 13:12
brad anderson

In response to: ... and so is the family

brad anderson [Visitor]
congratulations christoph and rebecca! i'm printing off a picture right now to show georgie...
PermalinkPermalink 06/14/05 @ 18:26